Slow-motion bias

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Tony.Williams
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Slow-motion bias

Post by Tony.Williams » Wed Aug 03, 2016 10:00 am

Here's an interesting item on the BBC News website, concerning a problem in court cases when a CCTV playback of a crime is shown in slo-mo: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-36940475

It appears that slowing down the action gives jurors the impression that the perpetrator's actions were more deliberate and therefore increases the chance of conviction.

Some tests involved "juries" being shown footage of an incident in which someone was killed: one jury was shown the video at normal speed, one only in slo-mo, and one saw both. The jury which saw only the slo-mo view was 3.42x more likely to find the perpetrator guilty of first-degree murder than the jury which saw only the normal speed version. The jury which saw both was still 1.55x more likely to reach a guilty verdict.

Similar concerns may affect refereeing decisions involving punishing players in sports which allow immediate slo-mo replays.

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chaggle
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Re: Slow-motion bias

Post by chaggle » Wed Aug 03, 2016 4:44 pm

Very true in Rugby.
Don't blame me - I voted remain :con

Croydon13013
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Re: Slow-motion bias

Post by Croydon13013 » Wed Aug 03, 2016 9:16 pm

chaggle wrote:Very true in Rugby.
Yes. I've noticed this in several sports. Incidents that, a few years ago, would have been "we'll never know" are now analysed in slow-motion from several different angles and it is concluded that someone is a villain because they should be able to think 100 times faster than anyone else can.
thIS sIGnaTure iS an

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chaggle
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Re: Slow-motion bias

Post by chaggle » Thu Aug 04, 2016 9:26 am

Croydon13013 wrote:
chaggle wrote:Very true in Rugby.
Yes. I've noticed this in several sports. Incidents that, a few years ago, would have been "we'll never know" are now analysed in slow-motion from several different angles and it is concluded that someone is a villain because they should be able to think 100 times faster than anyone else can.
Yes - I was going to elaborate but the forum wouldn't let me yesterday.

Particularly in dangerous play situations in Rugby - high tackles and tackling the man in the air for instance - the commentators are always saying that the slo-mo makes things look much worse than the real speed replay.

I'm sure referees know this and take it into account.
Don't blame me - I voted remain :con

Tony.Williams
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Re: Slow-motion bias

Post by Tony.Williams » Thu Aug 04, 2016 9:55 am

chaggle wrote:
I'm sure referees know this and take it into account.
The results of the experiments in the OP suggest that seeing a slow-mo still affects judgment.

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