Scion

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chaggle
Posts: 2313
Joined: Mon Oct 26, 2015 10:01 am

Scion

Post by chaggle » Mon Oct 26, 2015 5:06 pm

Anyone convinced enough by the promise of this...

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/ ... nuine.html

... to put up some dosh?

I'm not.

Mind you if it can tell the difference between homeopathic remedies, it'll be worth a bob or two...
Don't blame me - I voted remain :con

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Zep
Posts: 1315
Joined: Sun Oct 25, 2015 7:37 pm

Re: Scion

Post by Zep » Mon Oct 26, 2015 5:07 pm

I thought it was bleeding obvious: Someone is going to fork out big lumps of money for a completely useless piece of "silicon chip" and an app that simply takes photographs of the subject matter which can then be identified fairly readily by a basic image-analysis process and a small database: Oranges are big and round and, well..orange; sauce bottles have the word "SAUCE" on them; peas are small and green and numerous; tablets are small and white and numerous, etc, etc. It even seems to be asking the user to enter the type of food they are scanning, which helps limit the processing required. And it's (written on the packet that it's) from Israel too, which surely means it's genuine! :wry

Never underestimate the dumbity of the Daily Mail readers...

Matt
Posts: 867
Joined: Sun Oct 25, 2015 7:50 pm

Re: Scion

Post by Matt » Mon Oct 26, 2015 5:08 pm

Zep wrote:I thought it was bleeding obvious: Someone is going to fork out big lumps of money for a completely useless piece of "silicon chip" and an app that simply takes photographs of the subject matter which can then be identified fairly readily by a basic image-analysis process and a small database: Oranges are big and round and, well..orange; sauce bottles have the word "SAUCE" on them; peas are small and green and numerous; tablets are small and white and numerous, etc, etc. It even seems to be asking the user to enter the type of food they are scanning, which helps limit the processing required. And it's (written on the packet that it's) from Israel too, which surely means it's genuine! :wry

Never underestimate the dumbity of the Daily Mail readers...
I'd actually be quite impressed by a device that identified products like you describe. It could do way with barcodes.

However that doesn't fit with the demo. Where it's the food material being scanned rather than the packaging.

(To switch to full screen, click the Full screen icon in the bottom corner of the video player.

To exit out of full screen, press Esc on your keyboard or click the Full screen icon again.)

The theory underlying the product doesn't look like pseudo science and at a first pass the capabilities being described look realistic http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Near-infrared_spectroscopy

However it's a fair old chunk of change so I doubt I would find it worthwhile myself. I can get much the same functionality from the biotechnological optical scanner and associated database already platform built into my head (eyes and brain)

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Zep
Posts: 1315
Joined: Sun Oct 25, 2015 7:37 pm

Re: Scion

Post by Zep » Mon Oct 26, 2015 5:09 pm

Matt wrote:
Zep wrote:I thought it was bleeding obvious: Someone is going to fork out big lumps of money for a completely useless piece of "silicon chip" and an app that simply takes photographs of the subject matter which can then be identified fairly readily by a basic image-analysis process and a small database: Oranges are big and round and, well..orange; sauce bottles have the word "SAUCE" on them; peas are small and green and numerous; tablets are small and white and numerous, etc, etc. It even seems to be asking the user to enter the type of food they are scanning, which helps limit the processing required. And it's (written on the packet that it's) from Israel too, which surely means it's genuine! :wry

Never underestimate the dumbity of the Daily Mail readers...
I'd actually be quite impressed by a device that identified products like you describe. It could do way with barcodes.
I suspect it works only if you hold it up close so the product fills the screen. I'd like to see it distinguish silver beet from celery.
However that doesn't fit with the demo. Where it's the food material being scanned rather than the packaging.
Indeed so. I suspect it lumps all "orange things" under the heading "fruit", all "green things" as "vegetables", etc. And there's plenty of software already available that scans images for recognisable text.

The theory underlying the product doesn't look like pseudo science and at a first pass the capabilities being described look realistic http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Near-infrared_spectroscopy
From that page:
...Near-infrared spectroscopy is, therefore, not a particularly sensitive technique...it can be difficult to assign specific features to specific chemical components...
In short, it's difficult to separate and identify specific compounds unless you have a large sample set and a big database of possible results to match against. On a mobile phone sampler? I suspect not.
However it's a fair old chunk of change so I doubt I would find it worthwhile myself. I can get much the same functionality from the biotechnological optical scanner and associated database already platform built into my head (eyes and brain)
Darn! You saw through their cunning plan!

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