Electric heating

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chaggle
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Electric heating

Post by chaggle » Mon Oct 26, 2015 6:46 pm

I am under the impression that all electrical heating devices (radiators, convector heaters, bar fires etc.) are effectively 100% efficient in that they all produce the same amount of heat from the same amount of electricity.

I have come across this which seems to contradict that

http://www.newatt.co.uk/wp/graphene
Having completed several years of research and development, Spanish manufacturer Newatt have launched a brand new electric radiator which consumes just a fraction of the electricity compared to that of all other heating devices, thus bringing an end to exorbitant winter heating bills forever. All thanks to Graphene.
http://www.newatt.co.uk/wp/choose-the-right-radiator
The rule of thumb is: you need approximately one third of the existing wattage when switching to Newatt low usage radiators. In other words, if you use a 1,500 watt oil filled radiator to heat a room now, you are likely to need a 500 watt Newatt radiator to heat the same room.
Any thoughts?
Don't blame me - I voted remain :con

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bindeweede
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Re: Electric heating

Post by bindeweede » Mon Oct 26, 2015 6:48 pm

It certainly sounds interesting. I'd like to see these radiators tested/assessed by independent heating engineers. I've searched but not found any.

It seems the potential for Graphene is considerable as its properties are unusual.

http://www.mpip-mainz.mpg.de/news/thermal_conductivity

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chaggle
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Re: Electric heating

Post by chaggle » Mon Oct 26, 2015 6:49 pm

bindeweede wrote:It certainly sounds interesting. I'd like to see these radiators tested/assessed by independent heating engineers. I've searched but not found any.

It seems the potential for Graphene is considerable as its properties are unusual.

http://www.mpip-mainz.mpg.de/news/thermal_conductivity
Apparently Stafford University has an Energy House for researching just this sort of thing. I found it while having a look at Radfans which are advertised on the telly.

http://www.radfan.com/pages/energy-saving
The Energy House at Salford University is a fully instrumented house built in an environmental chamber used by the likes of Saint Goban and B&Q to test energy saving product.
I have a feeling that companies are using weasel words to make out that their products use less power than others to produce the same amount of heat when this isn't actually so.
Don't blame me - I voted remain :con

Tony Williams
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Re: Electric heating

Post by Tony Williams » Mon Oct 26, 2015 6:50 pm

I'm a bit suspicious since "graphene" may be becoming the new "quantum" - tacked onto anything to make it sound real sciencey.

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