Brexit consequences

Tony.Williams
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Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2016 8:05 am
Location: Still somewhere in England
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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by Tony.Williams » Sun May 26, 2019 9:26 am

A quote I came across, attributed to Marx*, which seems appropriate for the times:

Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it whether it exists or not, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies.

*(Groucho, not Karl)

Tony.Williams
Posts: 1032
Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2016 8:05 am
Location: Still somewhere in England
Contact:

Re: Brexit consequences

Post by Tony.Williams » Thu Jun 06, 2019 2:00 pm

A good analysis of the Irish backstop issue: https://www.cer.eu/insights/northern-ir ... lternative
The Brexit trilemma lives. The UK can have two of the following three things, but not all of them: single market and customs union exit; a whole-UK Brexit; and no Irish border. The existence of a backstop in the withdrawal agreement suggests that May, albeit reluctantly, understood this. But the penny still hasn’t dropped for many Brexiters in her party and beyond.
A depressing blog post from Chris Grey: http://chrisgreybrexitblog.blogspot.com ... poria.html
Whatever happens now, that culture war is here to stay for the foreseeable future. At worse it will intensify. Whatever happens now, Brexit will dominate British politics for years, crowding out vital issues such as, currently, the social care crisis. At worse, it will overwhelm all other policies. Whatever happens now, the damage already done will persist (to take just one of many of examples: the European Medicines Agency is gone for good and with it the hub of the strategically crucial biomedical industry). At worse, it will cause a catastrophe.......

For remainers, there is no way to get back to 2016, just as for leavers there is no way forward to get what they were promised in 2016. In that sense, just as Brexit is on hold so too is Britain – suspended between an unrecoverable past and an unattainable future. Brexit has ceased to be, if indeed it ever was, understandable simply as an ‘institutional’ question about Britain’s membership of the EU. Instead it has morphed into a cultural battle about what Britain - England, especially, but not just England – is. So it has ceased to have an institutional answer, deliverable by normal forms of politics and policymaking. It is an aporia, a pathless path, with no way forward and no way back.

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