Brexit consequences

Tony.Williams
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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by Tony.Williams » Thu Jun 07, 2018 10:22 am

chaggle wrote:
Thu Jun 07, 2018 9:49 am
Susanna Reid on Good Morning Britain expressing astonishment and anger at the stupidity of having no plan for Brexit prior to the referendum - surely only surpassed by the stupidity of those who voted leave knowing there was no plan.
The Leavers were focused on getting their clear and simplistic message out - they didn't want to get bogged down in the detail and in fact countered every sensible argument against Brexit by screaming "Project Fear!".

It has to be admitted that as far as campaign planning and management were concerned, the Leavers did a good job and the Remainers were hopeless. I suspect that those organising the Remainer campaign didn't really believe that the Leavers could win, and by the time they realised the danger the Leavers had so much momentum they couldn't be stopped.

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bindeweede
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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by bindeweede » Fri Jun 15, 2018 9:02 pm

Something scary. Only open if feeling courageous. :ey
Spoiler:
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Tony.Williams
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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by Tony.Williams » Sat Jun 16, 2018 10:16 am

:fp

Matt
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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by Matt » Sat Jun 16, 2018 12:23 pm

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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by Matt » Sat Jun 16, 2018 12:24 pm

Or vice versa

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bindeweede
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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by bindeweede » Thu Jun 21, 2018 9:06 pm

Brexit? Always worth doing a bit of stirring. :thumb
The great irony of Brexit, then, is that it is teaching the UK that it already had the best model: EU membership.
https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/u ... membership

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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by Tony.Williams » Fri Jun 22, 2018 8:18 am

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-44570931
Airbus has warned it could leave the UK if the country exits the European Union single market and customs union without a transition deal.
That's 14,000 jobs directly at risk, plus an estimated 100,000 in the supply chain.

There will still be some "hard Brexiters" screaming "Project Fear!!!" when the bulldozers are levelling the former factories.

However, we need not worry, the USA will come to our aid - by selling us Boeings as part of any deal...

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chaggle
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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by chaggle » Mon Jun 25, 2018 2:09 pm

Two Brexiteer comments on the Airbus and BMW warnings;

So what? Companies close facilities all the time

So what? After Brexit our air industry will be building spitfires
Don't blame me - I voted remain :con

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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by bindeweede » Tue Jun 26, 2018 9:25 pm

"Clark Tells U.K. Business to Ignore Johnson, Speak Out on Brexit."
May faces mounting pressure to spell out her vision for Britain’s future relationship with EU, but must first reach consensus with her squabbling cabinet and party. Clark said those disputes were making the government look bad.
Bad or utterly shambolic? Answers on a pc please.

https://www.bloombergquint.com/politics ... -on-brexit

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chaggle
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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by chaggle » Wed Jun 27, 2018 7:18 am

U.K. Business Secretary Greg Clark urged industry leaders to speak out on what they want from Brexit
Shouldn't that have been done two years ago?

Actually Fox did just that at a meeting of business leaders soon after the referendum and got a big... :con

He told them they were lazy and just wanted to be on the golf course if I remember rightly.
Don't blame me - I voted remain :con

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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by bindeweede » Mon Jul 02, 2018 1:06 pm

A draft of Theresa May’s Brexit plan has already been dismissed as unrealistic by senior EU officials, who say the UK has no chance of changing the European Union’s founding principles.

“We read the white paper and we read ‘cake’,” an EU official told the Guardian, a reference to Boris Johnson’s one-liner of being “pro having [cake] and pro-eating it”. Since the British EU referendum, “cake” has entered the Brussels lexicon to describe anything seen as an unrealistic or far-fetched demand.
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/20 ... -officials

"I'd say it's all going rather well, wouldn't you, Wilson?" :con

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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by bindeweede » Mon Jul 02, 2018 11:23 pm

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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by Tony.Williams » Tue Jul 03, 2018 6:41 am

I have to confess to being consistently wrong about Brexit - in that I keep thinking that it can't possibly get any worse. :gh

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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by bindeweede » Thu Jul 05, 2018 5:34 pm

A letter, dated yesterday from the British Retail Consortium to May and Barnier.
Rt Hon Theresa May MP,
Prime Minister,
10 Downing Street,
London
SW1A 2AA

Mr Michel Barnier,
Chief Negotiator,
Taskforce on Article 50 negotiations
with the United Kingdom,
Rue de la Loi 200,
1049 Bruxelles,
Belgium
Richard Pennycook
Chairman
Helen Dickinson OBE
Chief Executive
4th July 2018
Dear Prime Minister, Mr Barnier,

It is time for a reality check on the damaging consequences for millions of UK consumers and tens of thousands of EU-based producers if we fail to reach an agreement in the Brexit negotiations that protects the free flow of goods between the EU and the UK from 29 March 2019.

50% of Britain’s food is imported, and of that 60% comes from the EU-27. In other words, nearly one third of the food eaten by 65m people in the UK comes from EU farms and factories. These well-established, just in time, supply chains are vital for providing choice and value to UK consumers, as well as protecting the livelihoods of tens of thousands of farmers and food producers in the EU.

To bring in a third of the food that the country eats requires a vast, complex and interconnected supply chain. To give a sense of the scale, according to the latest UK government figures, in 2016 3.6 million containers from the EU passed through UK ports, just under 10,000 per day. This equates to over 50,000 tonnes per day of food passing through our ports. These goods can currently enter the UK with minimal delay, which allows for truly frictionless trade. This means that salad leaves, for example, can be loaded onto lorries in Spain on a Monday, delivered to stores in the UK on a Thursday, and still have 5 days’ shelf life.

But this supply chain is fragile. Failure to reach a deal – the cliff edge scenario – will mean new border controls and multiple ‘non-tariff barriers’, through regulatory checks, that will create delays, waste and failed deliveries.

The consequences of this will be dramatic for UK consumers. It is likely that we will see food rotting at ports, reducing the choice and quality of what is available to consumers.
4th Floor, 2 London Bridge, London SE1 9RA
+44 (0)20 7854 8900
info@brc.org.uk brc.org.uk
British Retail Consortium - a company limited by guarantee
Registered in England and Wales No. 405720
The latest BRC analysis finds that food and beverage products would face an average
increase in the cost of importing from the EU of up to 29% from non-tariff barriers alone,
under a no deal scenario. Much of these increases will end up passed to consumers in higher
prices. And the impact on SME retailers in the UK will be devastating. Our figures estimate
that more than 12,500 small retail businesses will be at high risk of going bust in the event of
no deal.

The consequences for EU producers and the countries from which they export will be also be
severe. EU-27 businesses face losing £21 billion of agri-food exports to the UK.
Failure to achieve a smooth transition will create a lose-lose scenario for UK consumers and
EU producers alike. Time is running out as we are fast approaching the point where the food
supply chain can prepare for a no-deal Brexit at all, as EU farmers will want to know who
their customers will be before planting their crops or raising their animals this autumn, for
delivery to UK consumers next spring.

We must avoid the cliff edge on 29 March 2019 at all costs, so we call on the UK government
to focus on proposing a workable solution to the backstop that gets the Withdrawal
Agreement over the line and preserves frictionless trade during the transition period, and on
the EU to be flexible and creative in the negotiations and recognise what is at stake for
exports to the UK.

Yours sincerely,
Richard Pennycook Helen Dickinson OBE
Chairman Chief Executive
British Retail Consortium British Retail Consortium
https://brc.org.uk/news/2018/there-will ... dge-brexit

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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by bindeweede » Thu Jul 05, 2018 5:50 pm

And more up-to date news. It's reported in Spiegel Online that JP Morgan are to go ahead with preparations to relocate mostly to Frankfurt, Luxembourg and Dublin. This via Google Translate.
The US bank JP Morgan is pushing ahead with its preparations for the Brexit with the relocation of jobs from Great Britain. In a first step, "a few dozen" employees are scheduled to move to continental Europe by early 2019, the bank wrote in an e-mail to its 16,000 employees in the UK.

These are above all employees with customer contact and in risk management who work both in the investment bank and in asset management. Among other things, the letter sets out how the bank intends to strengthen its presence in Paris, Madrid and Milan, for example. So far, it was expected that Wall Street Bank will expand mainly in Frankfurt, Luxembourg and Dublin.

Until the exit of Great Britain from the EU on 29 March 2019, the bank in the EU wants to have "several hundred" additional jobs than before, it said in the e-mail. The relocations could also be slower if the EU and Britain agree on appropriate transitional arrangements.

Because of the slow pace of negotiations, the fear of a "hard Brexit" has risen in both the economy and in politics. The finance industry expects thousands of jobs to be relocated from the UK because of Brexit.
The original.........http://www.spiegel.de/wirtschaft/untern ... 16905.html

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