Brexit consequences

Tony.Williams
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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by Tony.Williams » Sat Mar 30, 2019 8:32 am

Well, May's deal has the obvious advantage that it was the result of long negotiations with the EU, which has already approved it. So it is probably the only route to get a decision on implementing Brexit in the time available. There seem to be only two alternatives which could be adopted within the timescale set by the EU - Nodexit, or cancelling Article 50. The last of these would be my immediate choice, but there seems very little interest among MPs. They don't like Nodexit either, but that doesn't require anyone to make a decision for it to happen - it's the legal default position.

So - if cancelling A50 is very unlikely to happen, that leaves us with May's deal or Nodexit, with Nodexit happening unless something happens to stop it (and just voting not to do it would make Cnut laugh).

The only other possibility - a long break to give further consideration to other options - is not under our control, because the EU would have to agree to a new timetable by 12 April. It seems that Macron, for one, has run out of patience, and it only takes one to block it...

I think that Nodexit could be catastrophic, which leaves May's deal as the least worst of the feasible options.

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chaggle
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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by chaggle » Sat Mar 30, 2019 10:53 am

May used some words yesterday in parliament that made me think.

"I fear we are reaching the limits of this process in this house."

I wondered by what means she intended to take it forward if not via parliament.
Don't blame me - I voted remain :con

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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by Tony.Williams » Sat Mar 30, 2019 1:13 pm

chaggle wrote:
Sat Mar 30, 2019 10:53 am
I wondered by what means she intended to take it forward if not via parliament.
Might she have meant a general election?

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chaggle
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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by chaggle » Sat Mar 30, 2019 1:19 pm

Possibly - I was thinking 2ref.
Don't blame me - I voted remain :con

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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by Croydon13013 » Mon Apr 01, 2019 2:02 pm

The gossip is that she wants a general election. But two-thirds of MPs would have to vote for it and it's hard to believe that enough Tories are that stupid.
thIS sIGnaTure iS an

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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by Tony.Williams » Mon Apr 01, 2019 8:42 pm

Croydon13013 wrote:
Mon Apr 01, 2019 2:02 pm
it's hard to believe that enough Tories are that stupid.
Quite a few of them seem to be getting on the TV in an effort to demonstrate you're mistaken... :roll:

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bindeweede
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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by bindeweede » Wed Apr 03, 2019 12:02 am

I have finally lost the ability to comprehend what is going on. I'll just have a small one, and go to bed. :ang

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bindeweede
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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by bindeweede » Fri Apr 05, 2019 9:09 am

New buzz word. - "Flextension."😵

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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by Tony.Williams » Fri Apr 05, 2019 10:54 am

Some of the MPs do help in simplifying the whole process. F'rinstance, if Mark Francois says he's against something, then I'm for it - no further thought required. :thumb

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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by Croydon13013 » Fri Apr 05, 2019 2:25 pm

bindeweede wrote:
Fri Apr 05, 2019 9:09 am
New buzz word. - "Flextension."😵
I just heard someone say "Flexit", meaning a flexible Brexit. I don't like that. It doesn't make sense to me because once you've removed the "Br" it's just a flexible exit.
thIS sIGnaTure iS an

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bindeweede
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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by bindeweede » Sat Apr 06, 2019 1:36 pm

Croydon13013 wrote:
Fri Apr 05, 2019 2:25 pm
bindeweede wrote:
Fri Apr 05, 2019 9:09 am
New buzz word. - "Flextension."😵
I just heard someone say "Flexit", meaning a flexible Brexit. I don't like that. It doesn't make sense to me because once you've removed the "Br" it's just a flexible exit.
Earlier today, I saw the word "Brextinction". Now, I DO like that!

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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by Tony.Williams » Sat Apr 06, 2019 8:23 pm

bindeweede wrote:
Sat Apr 06, 2019 1:36 pm

Earlier today, I saw the word "Brextinction". Now, I DO like that!
Hmmm, not too sure about that - if Brexit means "British exit" then Brextinction means "British..."? :???:

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bindeweede
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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by bindeweede » Sat Apr 06, 2019 10:14 pm

Point accepted, obviously. But what would be the portmanteau word combining "Brexit" and "Extinction"?

Ho Hum. Whatever. Found a site that creates portmanteau words. Entering those two words, it comes up with....
brexit extinction
brextinction, brenction, brinction, bren, brion, brexixtinction, brexextinction, brexinction, brexin, brexion, brexnction, brtinction, brexn, brtion, brexitnction, brexitn, brextion, brexxtinction, brexitxtinction, bretinction, brection, brexitinction, brexiction, bextinction, binction, bion, breextinction, breinction, breion, btinction, btion, bretion, brexction, brexittinction, brexitction

extinction brexit
extixit, extexit, extit, extinctioxit, extinctexit, extinctiot, extinctit, exxit, extinxit, extrexit, extint, extxit, extinctionxit, extinctrexit, extinctiont, extinctxit, eit, extiit, extinctioit, exexit, extincexit, extincit, exrexit, extincrexit, extincxit, extinit, extinctionit
http://www.portmanteaur.com/?words=brexit+extinction

Time for my bed, I think. :thumb

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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by Tony.Williams » Sun Apr 07, 2019 12:27 pm

Well, I've run through various emotions during the Brexit process with sheer exasperation dominating, but for the first time I am feeling shocked and angry. Not by anything May has done (for once) but by the reaction to her belated attempt to cross party lines to find a solution (a bloody obvious move, given the close result of the referendum and most especially the lack of a government majority since 2017). After all, Brexit has not particularly been a party political issue, both major parties being split pretty well down the middle over it.

However, with the honourable exception of certain brave souls from both parties who have been trying very hard to work together to come up with a solution to the deadlock, the fact that May and Corbyn have dared to meet to discuss this has apparently enraged substantial numbers of MPs and members on both sides, with shouts of "betrayal!". This has made it glaringly obvious that these people put party interest (or to be precise, the interest of their sects within each party) far above the interests of the country - the hardline Tory Brexiters will do and say anything to force their particular view onto everyone else, while the hardline Labourites are furious that Corbyn might actually help to try to find a solution to the problem. Both sides seem to be digging their tribal bunkers ever deeper while shouting abuse over the parapets, neither giving a damn about finding enough common ground to repair some of the damage which has been done to our society.

Never before have the limitations and failings of our political system been so obvious. It is so dysfunctional that it is clearly no longer fit for purpose. The adversarial approach resulting from a winner-takes-all election system, reinforced by the physical layout of the Commons, has now resulted in a system which cannot compromise, cannot negotiate, cannot stomach the thought of having anything to do with the "enemy" - the other party. It is pathetic, it is infuriating, and it makes our Parliament - and our nation - look like a bunch of incompetent fools.

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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by bindeweede » Sun Apr 07, 2019 9:32 pm

Tony, I've been thinking of something to add. Failed. Thanks.

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