Badger cull

smudge
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Badger cull

Post by smudge » Mon Nov 09, 2015 7:47 pm

Depressing and infuriating;

Badger cull 'mindless', say scientists
Government's chief scientist among those who dispute evidence used to justify killings, which may begin imminently

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2 ... l-mindless


Culling badgers could increase the problem of TB in cattle
Badger culling risks becoming a costly distraction from nationwide TB control

http://www.guardian.co.uk/theobserver/2 ... intcmp=239

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bindeweede
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Re: Badger cull

Post by bindeweede » Mon Nov 09, 2015 7:55 pm

Yet another U-turn could be on the way.
A Whitehall source told the Guardian that, because the killing costs have to be borne by farmers and landowners, the National Farmers' Union (NFU) president, Peter Kendall, feels the cull may now be too expensive to carry out, given the new higher badger numbers. The government's own impact assessment had already shown that carrying out the cull will cost more than it saves. A spokesman for the NFU said they did not recognise that view from Kendall and were not aware of any change in the government's policy.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2 ... ull-u-turn

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polomint38
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Re: Badger cull

Post by polomint38 » Mon Nov 09, 2015 7:56 pm

To cook one badger you’ll need:

1 badger
1 glass of pig’s blood
1 small glass of armagnac
1 ginger root
1 bottle of dry, sparkling white wine
2 eggs
1 pot of crème fraîche
salt and pepper
500g forest mushrooms OR chestnuts to accompany
100g butter
oil
http://www.gastronomydomine.com/?p=184

What wine should I serve with this?

Has anyone here eaten badger (no carry on type comments please)

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chaggle
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Re: Badger cull

Post by chaggle » Mon Nov 09, 2015 7:57 pm

polomint38 wrote:
To cook one badger you’ll need:

1 badger
1 glass of pig’s blood
1 small glass of armagnac
1 ginger root
1 bottle of dry, sparkling white wine
2 eggs
1 pot of crème fraîche
salt and pepper
500g forest mushrooms OR chestnuts to accompany
100g butter
oil
http://www.gastronomydomine.com/?p=184

What wine should I serve with this?

Has anyone here eaten badger (no carry on type comments please)
Eviscerate and skin your badger, and soak it in a fast-flowing river for at least 48 hours. This will help you to de-grease it more easily.
:s

I only realised that article was a spoof when I read this bit:
This is a fantastic book. Sorry, Ben, but I’m unlikely to end up cooking anything from it; that said, it makes great bedtime reading, and is a marvellous tool with which to terrify impressionable French children.
Ridiculous. There's obviously nothing you could tell French children about food that would terrorise them. They eat all sorts of shite over there.
Don't blame me - I voted remain :con

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bindeweede
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Re: Badger cull

Post by bindeweede » Mon Nov 09, 2015 8:00 pm

Perhaps not a U-turn, simply a "delay".
The environment secretary Owen Paterson is to announce that the government is delaying its plan to cull thousands of badgers, probably until next year at the earliest, amid growing concern about the cost and effectiveness of the controversial scheme.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2 ... or-setback

Guardian quite enjoying it, I expect.

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Zep
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Re: Badger cull

Post by Zep » Mon Nov 09, 2015 8:01 pm

What if the badgers decide to cull people...

smudge
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Re: Badger cull

Post by smudge » Mon Nov 09, 2015 8:01 pm

Who would have thunk it? Cull was to start any day now. But Winter came. All sudden and surprising and unexpected. Spoiled the perfectly good plan.

On Friday they were denying any delay.

panama
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Re: Badger cull

Post by panama » Mon Nov 09, 2015 8:02 pm

It has always seemed to me that the case for badgers being a major vector in the spread of the disease was unproven and that any cull would, in any case,probably be ineffective. I wondered why cattle weren't inoculated against the disease. This article seems to answer that question:

http://www.bovinetb.co.uk/article.php?article_id=48
However, the stumbling block is now the EU procedures, which, we are told, will not be completed until 2015! This is not good enough and derogation should be sought NOW so a vaccination programme can be started for cattle as a matter of urgency (already successful in trials in Ethiopia where they cannot afford to keep culling cattle needlessly). If cattle are vaccinated there may then be no need to tackle wildlife reservoirs, thereby saving these costs too

Croydon13013
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Re: Badger cull

Post by Croydon13013 » Mon Nov 09, 2015 8:03 pm

It is worth remembering that it is "Bovine" TB, not "Badger" TB. The main cause of spread is the farming community moving cattle around. In areas where there are badgers but no cattle, the badgers do not carry TB. In areas where there are cattle but no badgers, then there can still be outbreaks of TB. While the complete slaughter of badgers (if possible) probably would reduce the number of cases of TB in cattle, it won't eliminate it.
thIS sIGnaTure iS an

Tony Williams
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Re: Badger cull

Post by Tony Williams » Mon Nov 09, 2015 8:03 pm

There was a recent independent analysis of the data from other culling activities here and elsewhere which concluded that a badger cull could be expected to reduce the number of cattle herds affected by around 16%.

smudge
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Re: Badger cull

Post by smudge » Mon Nov 09, 2015 8:04 pm

Do you have a link Tony?



I dont have time to get into an involved debate (fighting fires I'm afaraid) but here's the Defra final report with some of their conclusions;


http://archive.defra.gov.uk/foodfarm/fa ... report.pdf

1.On the basis of our careful review of all currently available evidence, we conclude that badger culling is unlikely to contribute positively, or cost effectively, to the control of cattle TB in Britain (10.48 and 10.92).

Conclusions and recommendations
15. Detailed evaluation of RBCT and other scientific data highlights the limitations of badger culling as a control measure for cattle TB. The overall benefits of proactive culling were modest (representing an estimated 14 breakdowns prevented after culling 1,000km2 for five years), and were realised only after coordinated and sustained effort. While many other approaches to culling can be considered, available data suggest that none is likely to generate benefits substantially greater than those recorded in the RBCT, and many are likely to cause detrimental effects. Given its high costs and low benefits we therefore conclude that badger cullingisunlikelytocontributeusefullytothecontrolofcattleTBin Britain,andrecommend that TB control efforts focus on measures other than badger culling (Chapter 10).
16. In contrast with the situation regarding badger culling, our data and modelling suggest that substantial reductions in cattle TB incidence could be achieved by improving cattle-based control measures. Such measures include the introduction of more thorough controls on cattle movement through zoning or herd attestation, strategic use of the IFN test in both routine and pre-movement testing, quarantine of purchased cattle, shorter testing intervals, careful attention to breakdowns in areas that are currently low risk, and whole- herd slaughter for chronically affected herds (Chapters 7 and 10).

Interesting to note that they also state that cattle are certainly passing bovine TB to Badgers. I suggest we reduce the number of cattle in order to prevent disease spreading to wildlife.

I'll add that even if killing 70% of the badger population could be shown as effective way to reduce TB in cattle I'd be against doing so. As far as I can see that's not the case.

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Re: Badger cull

Post by Tony Williams » Mon Nov 09, 2015 8:05 pm

smudge wrote:Do you have a link Tony?
New Scientist, 20th October.

smudge
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Re: Badger cull

Post by smudge » Mon Nov 09, 2015 8:05 pm

Thanks.

Think it must be this one;
http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg2 ... tml?page=1

Can't say I'm convinced it adds much, differing interpretations of same studies.

Even if we dismiss the problems many experts are pointing out with the policy, is killing such a huge number of wild animals justified in order to 'possibly' avoid infection in just 16% of cattle?
Not as far as I'm concerned.

Then there is the financial cost; http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/earthn ... lions.html

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bindeweede
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Re: Badger cull

Post by bindeweede » Mon Nov 09, 2015 8:06 pm

The e-petition launched by Brian May attracted over 150,000 votes opposing the cull. MPs discussing the cull voted against the policy by 147 votes to 28 today, but apparently the parliamentary vote is not binding on the Government.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/po ... 26362.html

smudge
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Re: Badger cull

Post by smudge » Mon Nov 09, 2015 8:07 pm

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/ ... estershire

A shame nobody pointed out the impracticalities of the plan before they started.

Ah! Wait…. !

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