Driving psychology

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chaggle
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Driving psychology

Post by chaggle » Wed Aug 22, 2018 10:38 am

As a cyclist/motorist/walker I'm quite interested in the battle that goes on out there - particularly between cyclists and everyone else.

Here is a specific question. I've tried asking it in real life with mixed results.

Scenario 1. You are driving on a quiet 'A' road and come across a slow moving vehicle (bike/moped/horse). There is nothing coming the other way - there are no other vehicles around. There is a solid central white line. Would you see that there was no danger and cross the white line to pass the slow moving vehicle?

Scenario 2. You are on your bike waiting at a light controlled pedestrian crossing. The pedestrian has crossed and walked away. There are no other pedestrians in sight. Would you see that there was no danger and start to cross before the green light?
Don't blame me - I voted remain :con

Matt
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Re: Driving psychology

Post by Matt » Wed Aug 22, 2018 2:35 pm

I don't drive but my understanding of the solid central white line is that it's deployed when visibility is reduced e.g. due to bendy roads.

I suppose i takes less time to overtake a slow moving vehicle so perhaps you don't need to see as far ahead...

As for the bike question. It's been a while but I certainly used to opt to be a pedestrian if that help me get across a junction quicker, but that did involve getting off the bike and pushing it.

Tony.Williams
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Re: Driving psychology

Post by Tony.Williams » Wed Aug 22, 2018 3:29 pm

Scenario 1: it would depend on the circumstances: how big the slow vehicle was, how slowly it was going, how far ahead could I see clearly, whether there were any other roads joining mine from which another vehicle might suddenly emerge.... I would have to be VERY sure that it was safe.

Scenario 2: I'm not a cyclist, but as a driver I am very reluctant to pass red lights in all circumstances, so I guess that means I would stay put.

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chaggle
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Re: Driving psychology

Post by chaggle » Wed Aug 22, 2018 4:03 pm

Matt wrote:
Wed Aug 22, 2018 2:35 pm
I don't drive but my understanding of the solid central white line is that it's deployed when visibility is reduced e.g. due to bendy roads.

I suppose i takes less time to overtake a slow moving vehicle so perhaps you don't need to see as far ahead...

As for the bike question. It's been a while but I certainly used to opt to be a pedestrian if that help me get across a junction quicker, but that did involve getting off the bike and pushing it.
Mostly but not always. You can sometimes see a good long way.

Yes - I have become a pedestrian at times too. But once or twice I have simply tired of the ridiculous situation where there is no reason whatever why I should not just cycle over so I have - to be shouted at a few minutes later by car drivers who waited for the green - probably the same drivers who will overtake me when they see fit over a solid line.
Don't blame me - I voted remain :con

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chaggle
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Re: Driving psychology

Post by chaggle » Wed Aug 22, 2018 4:10 pm

Tony.Williams wrote:
Wed Aug 22, 2018 3:29 pm
Scenario 1: it would depend on the circumstances: how big the slow vehicle was, how slowly it was going, how far ahead could I see clearly, whether there were any other roads joining mine from which another vehicle might suddenly emerge.... I would have to be VERY sure that it was safe.

Scenario 2: I'm not a cyclist, but as a driver I am very reluctant to pass red lights in all circumstances, so I guess that means I would stay put.
These are the answers I usually get. Drivers will ignore the solid line rule where they deem it to be safe but will always stick to the red light rule. It's what I would do in a car. I would say that it's actually more dangerous to overtake over a white line than to jump a light (I'm talking about pedestrian crossings here - light controlled junctions are a different matter) as speeds are much higher.

In real life someone would now say - yeah, but I hate cyclists - always breaking the rules...
Don't blame me - I voted remain :con

Matt
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Joined: Sun Oct 25, 2015 7:50 pm

Re: Driving psychology

Post by Matt » Wed Aug 22, 2018 5:17 pm

Joke I heard on the radio the other day:
When I die, I'd like to be cremated and have my ashes thrown...
into the face of an oncoming cyclist.

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