Brexit consequences

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bindeweede
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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by bindeweede » Wed Feb 07, 2018 9:21 pm

Image

I'm no expert, but were the top three areas not major areas voting Leave?

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bindeweede
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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by bindeweede » Wed Feb 07, 2018 9:30 pm

And then there is a very new item from Sky News. New Brexit leak reveals steep costs for UK industries

https://news.sky.com/story/new-brexit-l ... s-11240583

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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by Tony.Williams » Thu Feb 08, 2018 8:27 am

bindeweede wrote:
Wed Feb 07, 2018 9:21 pm

I'm no expert, but were the top three areas not major areas voting Leave?
Probably, although that isn't surprising. The economically poorest areas in the country are the ones most vulnerable to recession; they are also where people are most disillusioned with the country's political/economic situation (their old, heavy industries having been virtually wiped out), so they are inclined to vote against whatever Whitehall wants, on a "sod-you-lot" principle. The fact that they get most help from the EU obviously adds to their vulnerability when we leave, and that makes their actions seem illogical - but Brexit is primarily an emotional decision, not a logical one.

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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by Tony.Williams » Fri Feb 09, 2018 12:29 pm

Things are beginning to warm up: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-43001931
EU Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier has warned that a transition period immediately after Brexit in 2019 is "not a given".
He outlined continuing disagreements between the UK and EU over issues like freedom of movement during the period.
He also said the UK's decision to leave the EU single market and customs union meant border checks at the Irish border were "unavoidable".
Not really fair of him to point out the hard, cold truth that has been obvious from the start - the Irish border problem is not going to go away, and merely saying "we're going to solve it" doesn't achieve anything. It is inherently impossible to reconcile leaving the single market and customs union with maintaining an open border across Ireland. The government keeps kicking this can down the road, make vague comments about advanced technology monitoring (they have such an amazing record for complex IT systems, after all) while desperately hoping that something will turn up, but I really can't see a way of fudging this.

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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by bindeweede » Sun Feb 11, 2018 10:31 pm

George Soros tells why his love for Britain means he'll fight on to oppose Brexit, from something of a surprising source.
I consider Brexit a tragic mistake.

Prior to Brexit, Britain enjoyed the best of all possible worlds: it was a member of the European Union without adopting the euro.

Allowing a referendum on membership was a fatal error. Experience has shown that referenda often lead to bad decisions. Egged on by unscrupulous agitators, people use them to express their dissatisfaction with the current state of affairs rather than contemplating the consequences. The fact that conditions are unsatisfactory does not mean they can’t get worse. That is what has happened in Britain.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/artic ... rexit.html

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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by chaggle » Mon Feb 12, 2018 7:11 am

If you read the comments (I've done so so you don't have to - no need to thank me) you will see why The Mail carried this.

It allows the faithful to splutter with indignation at a rich foreign 'establishment' figure who's only in it for what he can get (I could go on and on about what they think of him) trying to undo the will of the common working man who voted overwhelmingly to leave the corrupt... blah... blah...

I.e. it reinforces leaver sentiment.
Don't blame me - I voted remain :con

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Re: Brexit consequences

Post by Tony.Williams » Mon Feb 12, 2018 8:54 am

The referendum issue is an important one, and Soros makes some good points. We are not Switzerland, and our tradition is for parliamentary decision-making rather than referendums - making important decisions is what parliament is supposed to do, the electorate's job is to choose the parliament. Just because something is generally popular (or unpopular) does not mean that it should necessarily override parliament's considered view. The death penalty is a good example of this being accepted.

I think that the country should either uphold parliament and reject referendums, or should establish a high bar for referendum results in the case of major constitutional change: either requiring a majority of all eligible voters (not just those who vote) or requiring some kind of super-majority. Too late for the EU, though...

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